Expecting another record-breaking day of heat, I was out early watering the garden and noticed these larvae on the eggplant.  Voraciously hungry, they had already done a fair amount of damage and they were clearly emerging since there were a fair number of a variety of sizes.  These in the photo would have been about the largest.   They were on both the upper and lower surface, often with three to six on a leaf.  I removed perhaps four dozen and snapped this photo for reference.  Keeping an organic garden means our choices for control are limited.  Typically when we get this type of infestation, I remove all the pests and that ends the problem.  Hopefully that approach works in this case.  Any ideas on what larvae this is?  Looks a bit like a Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB).  I do remember the leaves getting pin holes about four weeks ago which I thought to be the flea beetle.  Could be related or might not be.

LarvaeEggplant

Everyone needs an outdoor bread oven. So several years ago, at the insistence of my spouse, I built an Alan Scott 32″ by 48″ outdoor wood fired bread oven. We use it every weekend, though perhaps more for cooking dinner or pizza than baking bread. We dream that will change .. but the reality of sleeping late is, that a baker you do not make!

On the other hand, Wave Hill in Wilton bakes wonderful bread. They have a clever business model. Make one thing, and make it well. They sell to a number of independent markets and also at many of the local farmers markets throughout Connecticut.

I love the wooden racks they use for efficient stacking of the bread.

Bread Rack

Wave Hill Bread

One beautiful day in early August my garden was abloom with Echinacea and abuzz with bees and butterflies.

And I just learning to use my new camera lens was trying to figure out how to control depth of field on my digital camera. Turns out exactly the same way I would have done so on my film camera. The following photos provide great justification for planting a perennial garden. Read the rest of this entry »

For some reason today the conditions were perfect for hunting chestnut in the Wilton Town Forest. While I’ve hiked this area many times, and identified many chestnut, today the American chestnut were making themselves known. There were also some astounding discoveries I had never before seen – more about that later. But for now, let me focus on the American chestnut of Wilton Town Forest. Read the rest of this entry »

The garden plan called for gates on opposite sides of the garden, one toward the house and the other accessing the compost. The gate facing the house was first priority and can be seen in some of the earlier posts or by clicking here. But the gate next to the compost seemed like a luxury and one I could live an eternity without. This eternity proved exceptionally annoying. Each time I encountered something destined for the compost it became a test of pitching ability. Read the rest of this entry »

Our favorite and most successful crop was by far the chard. We grew three types, a red, green and golden (bright lites) chard. Read the rest of this entry »

The original purpose of this blog was to track the performance of the garden over the season and get a better understanding of what works best for the garden site and our preferences. I have a huge collection of thoughts, but alas, never organized those to enter in the log. Still, I thought we could salvage some of the project by providing details on what grew well, and what we liked – as well as what we don’t need to grow again. Read the rest of this entry »

This post is about a very specific boat building tool that is of interest to but a smattering of individuals worldwide. But first a little background. Read the rest of this entry »

Last year we had a small eight foot by sixteen foot garden that produced an amazing amount of produce. The garden has a feebly constructed, yet amazingly effective fence. We attempt to exclude anything that would tamper with the garden – deer, rodents – and our perpetually hungry golden retriever. The retriever would actually press up against the fence until she could pop cherry tomatoes into her mouth. I didn’t think dogs were supposed to like tomatoes. Benners suggests that a small percentage of gardens require a dedicated gnawing fence of metal wire dug into the ground. I am following their recommendation and waiting until we determine if this is required before installing. The following is a recount of the design and installation of the fence. Read the rest of this entry »

I was driving on the Simpaug Turnpike just south of the West Redding Train Station and saw a sizable chestnut tree and sprouts on the east side of the road. The tree was quite large but had been topped at some point probably by line management trimmers. The trunk was of classic “smooth” chestnut bark, and about five and a half inches DBH. Read the rest of this entry »

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